The Baskerville Book League Wants You!

Emma Jane Holloway
September 8, 2013  •  No Comments

The mission is clear. Those of stout heart and brave spirit are welcomed to join in a campaign of bookshelf domination. I’m inviting friends of the Baskerville Affair trilogy to band together and spread the word about the series in a fun way. I’ll be there to chat with you, cheer you on, and show my appreciation.

 

First, contact me at [email protected] I will hook you up with the Book League and its Facebook page where you will meet other adventurers.

 

Then, undertake the mission that works for you. The first rule of the league is to enjoy yourself—so do whatever you are comfortable with. Running through the streets wearing nothing but a book jacket always gains great publicity, but not all of us are up for that. The mission is simple: to encourage as many people as possible to read my stories.

Share your thoughts about my books on your blog or web site.  Share my posts or updates on your Facebook or Twitter page.  The most important thing is that you: A) have fun and B) share the book love with people you think might enjoy my work. Sadly, we do discourage actual body modification as a sign of extreme fan devotion. Just because some of the characters are half-human and half-machine, it’s not a life choice we recommend in pursuit of purely cosmetic results.

 

The Adventure begins . . .  Pick at least three* League activities that you’re comfortable with.  Please let me know what you’re doing, with links, pictures, or whatever you can provide. If have questions, let me know.

 

If you’re sallying forth in-person, I’ll send you a supply package before the book release with pamphlets, postcards or various goodies to share with booksellers, friends, random book-reading strangers, etc.   If you need more materials, let me know.  If you need less, let me know that, too.  I’ll always include a little something for you, too, just to convey my appreciation. If you’re only doing online Book Love sharing, you’ll still receive that special thank-you gift.

 

*You are welcome to pick more than three, activities of course—but to earn goodies, you just need three.  They don’t have to be the same for each book.  Whatever works for you is greatly appreciated.

 

The Baskerville Book League Mission Options:

In Person

  • If you’re going to purchase a book, consider buying the book the first week it’s out.  First week sales are what make books bestsellers! Authors like that!
  • Visit your local bookstore(s).  Chat with the bookseller, talk up the book, ask to put bookmarks in all of the copies and leave promo materials at the sales or information desk. We appreciate it if you can get their card so that we can follow up later with additional information.
  • Visit your local store(s) that sells the book (independent and chain bookstores as well as Target, Walmart, Superstore, drug store, etc) and put the bookmarks in the books.  See if the store manager will let you put promo materials in the book section or on their freebie table. And if you don’t see the book on the shelves, ask the manager to stock it.
  • Visit your library(s) and talk the books up to the librarian.  Ask them to order the books and let them know I’m happy to supply reading group questions or do an online chat with readers.  Ask to leave promo materials at the desk.
  • Talk to your local Reader Groups about reading the book.  Share promotional materials with them.  Set up an online reader group chat with me to discuss the story.
  • Talk the books up to your friends, neighbors, hairdresser, dog walker, or the lady in line behind you at the grocery store. Give out pamphlets and recruit other league members.  Eventually, we will achieve world domination.

Online

  • Talk up the book to your friends, reader groups, Twitter pals, blog readers, Facebook friends, chat group buddies, the pizza delivery guy, and anyone and everyone you think might be interested.  Send them to my site and share the love.
  • If you’ve read the book and are comfortable doing so, write a review. Any review you give is great, but reviews when the book is first released help a ton!  Post the review on Amazon or on Goodreads or on Barnes & Noble or on your blog or on Facebook or anywhere that supports books and authors.
  • ‘Like’ the book (both mass market and Kindle) on Amazon, or on Barnes & Noble.  The more likes a book gets, the better chance readers will see it.
  • Host or interview me on your blog, or share my book trailers or covers.
  • Share or retweet my book news, posts, and random blither.  Maybe someone will see it and think ‘wow, I have to check this author out.’
  • Come by and visit me when I’m blogging, or in a chat, or otherwise blundering through cyberspace.

 

Before you embark on this adventure, a word of advice:  I appreciate any support you give me.  But too much sharing is a dangerous thing, especially online.  Once, twice a week is fabulous.  Once, twice a day might result in de-friending or interventions. You know your friends and your reader love venue best, though.  So go with what feels right, but never feel obligated to scream from the rooftops.  


The prequel is up!

Emma Jane Holloway
September 5, 2013  •  1 Comment

Click here to see it!

 

 


Free short story – prequel news

Emma Jane Holloway
September 4, 2013  •  3 Comments

Here is some very good news! The prequel story to my series will be available FREE online this Friday at the USA Today Happy Ever After Book Blog. The Adventure of the Wollaston Ritual will be featured as part of their Steampunk Fridays! Please spread the word and enjoy the story! I’ll post a link when it’s up.Cathedral


Warm fuzzies

Emma Jane Holloway
September 3, 2013  •  2 Comments

I got a nice appraisal in the October issue of RT Book Reviews! “Holloway’s splendid first entry in her Baskerville Affair series will thrill fans of steampunk urban fantasy.” That made me very happy, since I’m not exactly the poster girl for fitting neatly inside a genre category. Sometimes coloring outside the lines can earn one a frosty glare from reviewers if they’re of a very traditional mindset. Good for RT for accepting the book on its own terms, and many kisses to them for liking what they read. “The characters are thoroughly charming and the worldbuilding is first-rate.”

Publisher’s Weekly was also kind: “Holloway stuffs her adventure with an abundance of characters and ideas and fills her heroine with talents and graces, all within a fun, brisk narrative.”

Yes, all right, so this post is shameless self-aggrandizement. However, a little encouragement is welcome since I have a thick stack of page proofs to wade through!


Fare thee well and safe journeys, little copyedits!

Emma Jane Holloway
August 18, 2013  •  3 Comments

A study in ashes

So, I finished the copy edits on A Study in Ashes, which became abbreviated in emails to ASIA. The book seemed at least as big as Asia, clocking in at around 740-odd manuscript pages, which is twice the length of many mass market paperbacks these days. So I had a few plot threads to wind down. Sue me. Readers can’t accuse me of skimping.

I finished the copyedits in the wee hours of Tuesday morning, and now I’m just waiting for the page proofs. After that I’m done with the trilogy, which has been my alternate reality for the last year and a half.

By the time I get to proofreading the printed pages, I will have reread the book so often I barely “see” it anymore, which is why I ask other people who haven’t seen it before to read it at the same time. It’s interesting that after so many pairs of eyeballs, a fresh reader will still find mistakes.

For those that don’t know, the book production process goes something like:

  1. Author submits draft to editor
  2. Editor writes a letter to author that can be summed up as “bleh, rewrite it all”
  3. After a stiff drink, author submits draft #2 to editor
  4. Editor emails back the book bristling with comments and complaints
  5. After two more stiff drinks and some curse words, author submits draft #3
  6. Editor “ “ “ with comments and complaints, hopefully fewer this time.
  7. After four more stiff drinks, author submits not only a draft but her soul if only the editor will JUST ACCEPT THE STUPID BOOK.
  8. With a heavy sigh, the editor figures that’s the best she’ll get and sends the book to production

How do I feel about finishing? A bit stunned. A bit lost. Kind of relieved, but sad at the same time. I think it’s like the empty-nest syndrome.

However, there are plenty of plot threads to pick up and run with. I woke up at about three o’clock in the morning Wednesday night and suddenly I knew what one of the secondary characters wanted for her new plot arc.  I wasn’t quite ready to hear about it, but I was delighted to know there are still stories to be told about the Baskerville universe. But not until after a brief respite in the real world. I seriously need to clean my house!


Of arrivals and chocolate locomotives

Emma Jane Holloway
July 22, 2013  •  2 Comments

Mid July finds me wishing for a fainting couch and an anxious throng of domestic staff. To be clear, I always want the domestic staff, but not necessarily the couch. However, I have fallen into a boneless heap. Bring on the lavender water restorative cordials.

The third Baskerville book has been editorially blessed and has wafted over to the copyeditors for their attention—though I’m not sure a book with that many pages can actually waft. It probably rolled down the hallway on logs like a building block for an ancient pyramid, a few editorial interns puffing as they haul its juggernaut weight. No doubt some innocent mailroom clerk shall blunder into its path and be crushed. (Yes, I know it’s all done digitally but that’s not nearly as entertaining an image.)

In the meantime, I’ve been blessed with some shorts to copyedit.  Yes, readers, there shall be bonbons.

And in honour of all things steampunk and bonbon-ish (for what point are life’s landmarks without treats), here is a video dedicated to the world’s longest vintage steam train chocolate structure, displayed in Belgium: Belgian chocolate locomotive


Absinthe Martini

Emma Jane Holloway
July 18, 2013  •  No Comments

With thanks to a brilliant co-worker who provided this recipe. I haven’t tried it so I don’t know what it tastes like, but I’ve always been fascinated by the idea of absinthe. Click the image to get a version big enough to read.

absinthe


Tape Measure Clock

Emma Jane Holloway
June 4, 2013  •  2 Comments

Tape Measure ClockI do love interesting junk, which is clearly evident if you look around my house. Note that I say “look around” as opposed to “walk through” because all that interesting junk has a way of piling up and challenging my already feeble housekeeping instincts.

Anyway, a recent addition to the funky item collection is this critter. I was innocently walking by a collectibles store not that long ago and it was sitting all forlorn on the table outside. Of course it followed me home, because I have always loved timepieces and this one was unlike anything I’d encountered before. It’s a rotary clock called a “tape measure clock” (you set the time by twisting the top around until the pointer indicates the hour on the tape measure). These were made by Lux around the 1930s and this one still keeps perfect time. No plastic in this puppy. Unfortunately, it has a huge tick—kind of apocalyptic, actually—so I don’t wind it often.

 


In which Miss Emma lectures on female education

Emma Jane Holloway
June 1, 2013  •  2 Comments

University Coeducation in the Victorian EraI recall my undergraduate days in the manner I suspect most people do: fondly, with exasperation, and accompanied by many lingering questions. Will I ever voluntarily read anything by Dryden again? What was I thinking when I specialized in the Romantic poets? And what was in that orange stuff they served in the cafeteria? Did it emerge from the applied sciences or fine arts department to quiver upon our plates?

However, at least I—though a lowly female—got to go to university and get a bachelor’s degree of my choice. I was able to compete on equal terms for whatever fame and fortune accrue to undergrad English lit students (ha!). In other words, when it comes to education, women are very lucky to live here and now.

In researching A Study in Ashes, I had a look at the world of co-education in the Victorian era, both in the US and UK. Though my protagonist is in London, I set up my fictional collegiate university with features from several historical examples. Even though the school is only one setting in the book, it’s worth taking advantage of real life insanity.

Overall, the circumstances of women’s education were pretty much what one would expect: not every place offered the full meal deal to the girls. They got shorted on science and engineering and were offered floriculture and elocution instead. Academic terms were shorter, they couldn’t always access the same classes, and not every institution awarded them equivalent bachelor degrees. It goes on and on with the sort of hair-curling examples that make me realize just how far we’ve come in the last century and a half.

I would like to say that female education eventually came to be on equal footing with male schooling through the inexorable forces of social enlightenment. Um, well, I’m sure that had some effect but, as always, economic practicalities had a role to play as well. At first, many courses were segregated and professors had to teach the male students in one location and then trek out to another site to give their lecture (or a diluted version thereof) to the female class. Needless to say, efficiency won out and bit by bit the two groups became amalgamated. Another factor was, of course, the lure of commerce. Women were paying customers, and the revenue stream from their tuition was nothing to sneeze at, especially for the up-and-coming universities in America.

My source for much of this is University Coeducation in the Victorian Era by Christine D. Myers, which goes into detail about both the educational and social aspects of early co-education. It’s an academic study, but it’s good reading for anyone interested in the realities of the period.

 


A minor update

Emma Jane Holloway
May 20, 2013  •  No Comments

Subscribing to the boomerang theory of manuscript submission – book 3 went in and came back again, landing on my desk with a wet plop. Revision time! But at least the page proofs for book 2 are done, waiting like an eager puppy for the courier to take them back to New York. I’m rather glad to be focussed on the third volume now–I knew it needed more attention, and now I have the clear desk to give it the attention it needs.

The primary objective: more battle scenes. I think I need some of those toy armies, except maybe with giant steam-powered armadillos. Or dinosaurs.